Shoreditch Fashion Show

On 27th April, Offbeat and Made in Shoreditch magazine took over the Hoxton Docks for ‘The Shoreditch Fashion Show 2013′. The industrial warehouse space was transformed with unique illustrations, projections and installations on every wall of the venue producing the perfect ambience to host a festival encompassing an array of creative outlets.

The Shoreditch Fashion show 2013 was about more than just innovative fashion; it was a celebration of  live music, art and the work done by some of Britain’s best young designers. Each of the 10 independent designers showcased at the event were selected by a panel of judges (including Eliza Doolittle, Mischa Barton and Oliver Proudlock from Made in Chelsea).

Peyote provided the live soundtrack for majority of the catwalk show, their seductive rock’n’ roll sound was the perfect accompaniment to the models as they strutted their stuff across the stage. The four-some, originally from Bath, are definitely a band to watch out for. Check out their video for ‘Dirty Little Mind Games’.

Bands including an old favourite of mine, Deaf Havana and a new favourite The Thirst also graced the stage. The Thirsts’s performance really stood out with their electric groove sound and impeccable cover of the incredibly popular new Daft Punk track ‘Get Lucky’.

Screen Shot 2013-05-05 at 17.54.52Rufio Summers and James Craise, who headlined the last Made in Shoreditch Issue launch also played once again. Rufio captivated audiences with his soulful allure as he brought a modern twist to Blues and James Craise seemed to bare all of his emotions as he performed his originals and an awesome acoustic cover of Jessie Ware’s Night Light. 

The event was an incredible success, paving the way for future events of this calibre in Shoreditch.

Advertisements

Documentary Diary: Bill Cunningham New York

If you haven’t already seen ‘’Bill Cunningham: New York’’ it is certainly one to add to your list of films to watch. I have wanted to see this documentary for a while but was unable to find any screenings near me, so when I found it was playing on Sky Arts I was thrilled.

The filmmakers create an intimate portrait of the enigmatic photographer while exploring the role fashion plays within New York Society and the evolutionary nature of fads and style.

Through a number of interviews with the artist himself and his neighbors and friends we learn more about Bill Cunningham’s extraordinary life. The film focuses on the life of Bill however his muses are just as crucial to documentary as the photographer himself. Editta Sherman, who lives next door to him in Carnegie Hall, is perhaps the most notable. Editta’s huge studio next door to Bill Cunningham’s tiny apartment (with no kitchen, closet or his own bathroom) shows the modest life he leads. Although his friends and subjects live lives full of decadence and luxury, the photographer lives a humble life, not accepting more money than he needs to live on and doesn’t eat during his working hours. After Cunningham dropped out of Harvard University he started designing hats under the name ‘William J’. His time as a hat maker, however, was cut short after he was called to serve in the army. When he returned he started writing and became particularly interested in fashion journalism. It was then he started photographing women on the streets of New York City. What was so unusual about his photographs was that he would take candid pictures of well known people without their permission. His collections of images became a regular segment in The Times from December 1978 onwards.

The 84 year old now has, without doubt the most impressive street fashion and society archive around as he dedicated his whole life to what he does. He can be found cycling the streets of NYC with his film camera snapping photographs of the most striking and eye catching people the city has to offer. Having a name or a net worth won’t put you on Bill’s radar however, as Anna Wintour said ‘ Women dress for Bill’ they have to make an effort to get immortalized in his rolls of film. The documentary is punctuated with these intimate portraits from across the ages to remind viewers of the world Cunningham captures. The way he sees things in a different way from everybody else, finding beauty in the bizarre and the unusual.

The film is an emotional rollercoaster, though generally it is uplifting and often humorous. The production quality of the film is terrific and it makes for enjoyable and inspiring viewing for all.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: