All hail Lena Dunham…

Lena Dunham is taking the world by storm right now. The filmmaker turned actress, who has been nominated for four Emmys and is the winner of two Golden Globes, has a very open and honest approach to film injecting many of her own quirks and stories into her characters making them particularly relatable.

The multi talented twenty-something not only acts in her films/shows but she also writes and directs them too.  Her über realistic work shows that even the simplest story lines can be captivating and endearing. Dunham also listens to the constructive criticism fans give her, especially regarding the lack of diversity in her series. She had no qualms about speaking about the show’s race problems and even addressed it in her show with humour during a heated encounter on screen lover Donald Glover in which Dunham says ‘This is what you asked for.’ (perhaps a message to the viewers?) which receives the response ‘It’s about time.’ She stated herself that is was a clear statement that the creators were all comfortable and there wasn’t a political agenda against any race or sexuality.

Great things are set to come from Dunham, including a third season of GIRLS and a new comedy series is in the pipeline looking at the life of legendary stylist, Betty Halbreich. She also signed a $3.5 million deal to release her first book of essays called ‘Not that Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells you what she’s Learned’.

Advertisements

TV Buddha: Nam June Paik

Korean-American artist, Nam June Paik is considered to be the first video artist and his work has been shown in museums and galleries around the world. He was a visionary and he basically brought Television and Video into art and stressed that they weren’t sculpture, nor paintings but ‘Time art’. He understood the power and significance of the media and television in particular. He was actually the first person to use he phrase ‘electronic superhighway’ and predicted the internet age.

Perhaps his most notable piece of work, and one of my favourite installations, TV Buddha (1976) shows an antique Buddha statue opposite a small camera and video monitor on a closed circuit camera, capturing an encounter between the Western Technological Media-orientated world and Oriental deity. TV Buddha was a last minute addition to his fourth show in New York and was simply produced to fill the gap on an empty wall.

Screen Shot 2013-02-05 at 15.10.13

The piece raises questions about self perception as well as the relationship between the past and the present, ever evolving technology society depends so highly on.

His ability to so effortlessly blend media forms with art and to have a complete disregard for language barriers leads to thought provoking, creative pieces that have left a significant imprint on the world even after his death in 2006.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: